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post #1 of 44 (permalink) Old 03-17-2009, 05:37 PM Thread Starter
 
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Dealing with Coaches?

My Son is 12. He is a good kid. Athletic, good football player. Decided he wanted to try spring baseball. Somone actually told me he was a little old to start. 12 years old being too old for anything but kindergarden is about the most asinine thing I heard that week.
Anyway so he joins a team. We pay all the money, buy him all the crap he needs. Practice and work with him through the whole pre season. So now he can sit on the bench 4 out of 6 innings of every game and bat once if he is lucky. This is done so a selfish coach can win games. The team has 12 kids and the same 3 kids share all the bench time of every game.

They stopped holding practices the week games started. Half the other teams still practice but not ours. Exactly how is he suppose to learn anything without exposure to it? They knew he had no experience when they drafted him. My son loved the game when he first started. Now he looks at me and says he "Hates Baseball". I would hate it too if I spent 3 hours in a cage every game night.
How do you deal with [email protected]#ole coaches like this?
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post #2 of 44 (permalink) Old 03-17-2009, 05:52 PM
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Man that's tough. There's always a big problem with little league coaches as most of them are volunteers (idk if your son's league is the same). So seeing as they don't get paid, most of their satisfaction comes from winning, which is unfortunate for those players who will never see any playing time.

And the fact that he isn't giving practices anymore is ridiculous. When I played little league, when the regular season started, we practiced more. And our coach always made sure that everyone played in every game.

Again, I don't know how your league is, but I would say try to get him on a different team. Especially if your son likes this sport. What's the point of him being on the team if he isn't going to play? How is he supposed to learn and develop himself as an athlete? And I'm just gonna guess that talking to this coach would be pointless as well. So try to get him away from that coach. If not possible, take him to the park yourself and just throw around at least, even if you don't know much about the sport yourself.

So yeah, that's my opinion.


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post #3 of 44 (permalink) Old 03-19-2009, 08:31 PM
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Personally, I believe if a coach has the majority (all is the goal) of his players return the following year, then he did most of his job. Kids at that age should learn the FUNdamentals of the game. With that said, and I don't know how your league conducts the draft, but was your son on the coaches tryout draft list, or possibly assigned your son to his team by the league?

Again, my goal isn't to offend, as i've been head coaching multiple teams (I have 3 sons who play at different age levels)football, basketball, and baseball. So sometimes a coach sees things from a slightly different angle than a parent. I was assigned 2 9 year olds on my team this year (my team has 10 players--8 returning). The 2 players actually went up to bat and stood on the middle of the plate during their turn to bat at tryouts. They new absolutely nothing about throwing, hitting, or running. We get an 1 hour and 15 mins to practice 2 times a week, so obviously dedicating time to 1-3 slow kids is not realistic.

Here's the problem. The vast majority of our kids have been practicing\playing since they could hold a $5 Wal-Mart wiffle bat and ball. The 2 new kids just decided to give baseball a "go". I knew both parents from years of coaching in a basketball league. They never exposed their kids to baseball in any way, then decided to sign them up and figured that a team with only a few hours of practice time a week could do wonders with them.

A team cannot, and should not, practice at the level of their 2 slowest players! This is a parent responsibility, a responsibility to NOT put their kids, vastly unprepared kids, in a position to fail. I believe if a parent has $50-$80-or $100 to sign their child up and buy new equipment, then a little bit more money would go a long way in private lessons or other alternatives.

I am not an "everyone should get a participation trophy at the end of the season" coach. I believe opportunity should be earned, yes, even at that age, just like we earned it when we were young. (back when not everyone made the team..kids today are taught that happiness is something that should be given to them, and not earned).

Coaches at this age should "train" their players for the day when they have to earn a spot on a team (middle school, JV, Varsity), and SHOULD make it fun for them at the same time.

Now I know it sounds like i'm agreeing with everything the coach did, although I do agree with parts of it, your son should still be able to play outfield for at least 2-3 innings in a 6 innings game, and should be batting at least once also.

But if I were a new baseball dad in a league with a C or D skilled son, I would make sure to give him tangible skills to succeed, before buying expensive equipment and sending them to a team.

Also, paying a registration fee does not mean you get a say in team rules and practices. I would definitely try to transfer your son to another team, and if possible, a team without many veteran returning players, so that he will be able to grow with kids of his equal caliber. They may not win much, but at leat he'll get the opportunity to play.
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post #4 of 44 (permalink) Old 03-19-2009, 09:29 PM Thread Starter
 
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When I signed my son up I specifically asked if he would be able to play. That he would not be sitting in the dugout. They assured me that there are no more then 12 kids per team and that he would be in at least 4 innings per game. Now he sits in the dugout 4 innings per game. We have maybe 3 kids that do all the dugout time. Whats more the head coach that drafted him is his football coach from last year. He knows that my son has no baseball experience. What Im about to do is see how much of a problem a lot of p'd off parents can cause a head coach. And I wont give up until they fulfull the promise they made to us. I also work for the biggest sponsor of the league.
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post #5 of 44 (permalink) Old 03-20-2009, 03:01 PM
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Hamstermilk,

You have a valid complaint if the league and\or the coach assured you playing time for your son. I sure wouldn't sit back and give them a pass, BUT remember it's a lot of not what you say, but how you say it (smart way, and not so smart way to do it), as I said, even though your complaint may be valid, you still run the risk of gaining the hard-to-shake status of PP(problem parent, and sometimes the hardest thing to do is hold back. Is the coach a bad coach? a bad person in general? or is this a first time issue with him? I ask because if the coach is a longstanding member of the league with a good reputation, he most likely will come out of this being the windshield, not the bug. Again, a parent should always stand up for their child, but we have to watch to make sure he's not the kid who comes with "baggage" after all is said and done.

I hope this works out in your favor.

my wife deleted and email by accident from this site last night without reading it, so please resend if this was an email from someone on this forum.
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post #6 of 44 (permalink) Old 03-20-2009, 03:23 PM
 
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Just try to improve your game. Never quit a sport because of a coach. If you love it, you'll keep playing.
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post #7 of 44 (permalink) Old 04-21-2009, 02:00 PM
 
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This is an interesting discussion. Until yesterday, I was a Little League coach, AA division, 9/10. I am no longer a coach because of a parent mutiny. See, the team I coached (as an assistant, but with a very good friend of mine as manager) had at least four players with no heart. A couple are beginners at age 10, which I too believe is too late to start. Coach V-NC basically nailed it on the head -- there is no way for an older novice to compete against kids the same age with years of experience. I liken it to martial arts -- you wouldn't put your 12-year-old novice up against an expert 12-year-old. That's how challenging baseball is, it's a "one-off." It's not soccer, it's not basketball, it's not football. It's extremely complicated.

I was removed from the team by the parents because after volunteering hour after hour of my time, drilling their heartless kids over and over again while pouring my own heart out practice after practice and game after game with no result, I finally had enough and started publicly humiliating them for their boneheadedness, carelessness and lack of heart. See, there are at least three kids on the team who pour their own hearts out on the field, one of them is my son -- surprise, surprise. There's blood on him somewhere after EVERY game. And to lose games because some parent wanted their kid to "try baseball" who DOESN'T EVEN WANT TO BE THERE, who thinks it's some freaking joke, who uses the coaches as glorified and cheap babysitting, it is the most galling, resentful thing to experience. Well, these selfsame parents raising their darling little precious baby boys couldn't stomach it and revolted. So I am stepping down in everyone's best interest.

You know what? In the innings following down my public humiliation of these oxygen-wssters, two of them proceeded to raise the level of their defensive play from a 2/3 to a 9/10 on a 10-scale. We won the game going away. In short, I reached them and they finally started taking things seriously.

I hear over and over again that they're just 9-year-olds. Yeah, well they won't be forever. Someday, unless someone teaches them some life lessons like I described above, they'll wind up wards of their parents or the state.

Non-baseball parents and their time-and-energy wasting offspring make me physically ill. I am very glad to not be coaching anymore. Now maybe I can enjoy the game for once. And I can impart my baseball knowledge to my own son instead of giving other kids the advantages he deserves by birth and commitment.

If anyone can recommend a good competitive league in Orange County, CA, I would greatly appreciate it. Little League, Pony, etc. is garbage. Except for those precious little spoiled mama's boys. For them and their parents, it's cheap child care.
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post #8 of 44 (permalink) Old 04-21-2009, 06:53 PM
 
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Well being involved with LL in more ways than one I have seen this before. Although in Spring Ball it is putting the best team possible on the field for as long as possible. According to LL rules each kid only has to play one full inning in the field and get one at-bat. Also, a reason some coaches at that level don't hold practice is 1)The league is trying to cut down on electricity and 2) they are 12 and not very many kids wait until they are 12 to start playing baseball. It is an unfortunate situation for you and your son but the best thing to do is you practice with him to make him better, so that if he decides to play for a different coach next year he has the skills to help the team and will play more often. If I were you I would not confront him or the league about this because your son will get less PT from him and the league will always take a coaches side.

Good luck to you, and if you need anymore help let me know.
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post #9 of 44 (permalink) Old 02-23-2010, 11:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoLongerCoach View Post
This is an interesting discussion. Until yesterday, I was a Little League coach, AA division, 9/10. I am no longer a coach because of a parent mutiny. See, the team I coached (as an assistant, but with a very good friend of mine as manager) had at least four players with no heart. A couple are beginners at age 10, which I too believe is too late to start. Coach V-NC basically nailed it on the head -- there is no way for an older novice to compete against kids the same age with years of experience. I liken it to martial arts -- you wouldn't put your 12-year-old novice up against an expert 12-year-old. That's how challenging baseball is, it's a "one-off." It's not soccer, it's not basketball, it's not football. It's extremely complicated.

I was removed from the team by the parents because after volunteering hour after hour of my time, drilling their heartless kids over and over again while pouring my own heart out practice after practice and game after game with no result, I finally had enough and started publicly humiliating them for their boneheadedness, carelessness and lack of heart. See, there are at least three kids on the team who pour their own hearts out on the field, one of them is my son -- surprise, surprise. There's blood on him somewhere after EVERY game. And to lose games because some parent wanted their kid to "try baseball" who DOESN'T EVEN WANT TO BE THERE, who thinks it's some freaking joke, who uses the coaches as glorified and cheap babysitting, it is the most galling, resentful thing to experience. Well, these selfsame parents raising their darling little precious baby boys couldn't stomach it and revolted. So I am stepping down in everyone's best interest.

You know what? In the innings following down my public humiliation of these oxygen-wssters, two of them proceeded to raise the level of their defensive play from a 2/3 to a 9/10 on a 10-scale. We won the game going away. In short, I reached them and they finally started taking things seriously.

I hear over and over again that they're just 9-year-olds. Yeah, well they won't be forever. Someday, unless someone teaches them some life lessons like I described above, they'll wind up wards of their parents or the state.

Non-baseball parents and their time-and-energy wasting offspring make me physically ill. I am very glad to not be coaching anymore. Now maybe I can enjoy the game for once. And I can impart my baseball knowledge to my own son instead of giving other kids the advantages he deserves by birth and commitment.

If anyone can recommend a good competitive league in Orange County, CA, I would greatly appreciate it. Little League, Pony, etc. is garbage. Except for those precious little spoiled mama's boys. For them and their parents, it's cheap child care.
I have to be honest with you, I have a very difficult time believing that the above post is an actual response from an adult.

Last edited by MrOffshore; 02-23-2010 at 01:25 PM.
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post #10 of 44 (permalink) Old 05-07-2010, 10:32 AM
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Have you checked how long the other players have been playing baseball? I inderstand that your son might be a super athlete or a football all star, but baseball is different. The skills are different. One example, I used to coach high school baseball, and I invited a cousin who was a big kid, lineman and wanted to try baseball. He couldn't hit the ball even if I would give him a guitar, and right now he just signed a 3 year deal with the Buffalo Bills. Some kids start playing ball since 4 and they year round. So I recommend your check it out. Plus Little League is for the kids to have fun. Winning or losing should not be in their heads. If you really want to take it seriously, you need to do what your doing not once a week, but everyday. Batting practice everyday and a lot more personal training lessons.
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